Wednesday, 27 June 2012

Blackcurrant Juice?

As you know we left our church recently.  This has been such a traumatic but very eye-opening event and I'd like to be able to somehow put into words some of what I have been feeling and learning.  But I'm not sure I have the brain-power to do that right now.

At the moment we've been visiting a different church each Sunday.

We've visited two local community churches, both with real community spirit and lots going on.   They were both lovely and very friendly.  We've also visited a local Pentecostal church which was fun, but they are an Assemblies of God church which state that the baptism of the Holy Spirit is always evidenced by tongues...I've never spoken in tongues, so I suppose that leaves me out of the picture! :)  Anyway, it's a church that some friends and family attend, the people there are lovely, but I'm not sure it's the church for us.  We can always visit.

This Sunday we are attending our local Anglican church.  This is more for me than Hubs as I really struggle with blackcurrant juice in little cups and bread for communion that we have seen in the other churches. I long for a proper communion (Eucharist) (our old church was Anglican until the Pastor retired and our communion was very similar to a low-Anglican type communion).  The local Anglican church, which we will visit, says it is 'liberal catholic' in style - I'm not sure what that means, but I know they have incense.

What is it with the blackcurrant juice anyway?  I realise the reasoning of having non-alcoholic drinks for communion so that alcoholics can join in, but why blackcurrant juice?  Surely grape-juice would be better or non-alcoholic wine?

I suppose it all depends on your view of the Eucharist/communion and what it all means.  I have always believed in Real Presence, for me communion is more than mere intellectual remembrance, there is something so special about it. I feel a bit icky when it isn't treated reverently...and when there is blackcurrant juice! :)

Maybe I'm being fussy.  I don't know, it's all a big learning curve for me.  And if the family decides they like a church that has blackcurrant juice in tiny cups for communion, then I can always moon-light at the local Anglican every so often.

Originally posted on my old blog 27/6/12 reposted here 28/3/14

16 comments:

  1. That's very interesting. We come from an Anglican background, but have in our time been part of a small AOG church, English in France, and found them to be super people. Now we are back in England we are returning to our old Anglican church which is fairly evangelical.

    I dont think God makes any rules about being Spirit filled/tongues etc.

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    1. I totally agree Elizabeth, I believe that being filled with the Spirit of God is evidenced in many different ways and there are no rules other than having the life of Christ within us. :)

      I checked out the AoG website (http://www.aog.org.uk/About-Us/what-we-believe.html) and they state: We believe in the Holy Spirit baptism. The evidence of the Holy Spirit baptism is the supernatural ability to speak in tongues - a language we have not learned or have known.

      Perhaps I could chat with their Pastor, who seems very approachable, and see if the church has an opinion on the AoG Statement of Faith.

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  2. I've been praying and will continue to pray that God will lead you to the church He wants you to attend, my sweet friend. :o) {{{Gentle Hug}}}

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  3. Churches that I've been to that teetotal (like our current one) have always used grape juice so I couldn't say.

    I don't have time to write but I have some thoughts about communion.

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    1. Tee-total I don't mind. I'd love to hear your thoughts.

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  4. It is so difficult finding a new home church. We were in that position a few years ago. Blackcurrant juice for communion? I have never heard of that before. All I have ever heard of was grape juice (or wine). I hope & pray you will be able to find a place soon :)

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  5. When you get to your new church home, you will know it! I did when I found my last church, and then many years later (last year) when we started attending where we are members now.
    BTW, not that I know a whole lot, but our current church is A/G and does not believe that the baptism of the Holy Spirit must be evidenced by the gift of tongues - they have specified that belief time and again. So I suppose that can differ?
    God bless your search. It's a blessing to get out of that "limbo/looking" stage.
    And I still have the above Amy Carmichael quote on the fridge. What an inspiration - thanks!

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    1. In my reply to Elizabeth above I've shown the link to the AoG-UK website and their Statement of Faith with the particular point I mentioned. I thought that affiliated churches had to affirm the same Statement of Faith in order to be an AoG church? Maybe I'm wrong.

      It was a lovely church and we will certainly visit. I've had people try to pressure me to speak in tongues before and I didn't like it, so I don't want to be in that position again.

      The Amy Carmichael quote is awesome! :)

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  6. I used to do voluntary work in our local Christian book shop. We were once dusting the wafers and the communion wine when she said, "don't they know that Asda batch (cob) and Ribena will do?" Now, that's what I call low church. Liberal Catholics are high church, but probably not a "Forward in Faith" parish...all the smells and bells but pro women, at least that's what they are around our neck of the woods. Methodists believe in real pressence, have you got around to visiting those folks yet? I'd be really interested to hear your opinions.

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    1. I can imagine that this church is pro-women as it's a female vicar, it would be funny if it was a female vicar who preached a conservative viewpoint, lol. :)

      We've not visited the local Methodist yet. I remember a friend of mine from school went to a Methodist and they had blackcurrant juice for communion - I think it varies greatly depending on the Methodist church. I know the Wesleys believed in real presence.

      I'm not sure what I mean by 'Real Presence', whether I mean the same as the Wesleys did. I remember consubstantiation being our church's viewpoint when it was Anglican, when our Pastor retired he changed his theology to mere remembrance, then changed again to it being more spiritual.

      I suppose it is a mystery to me, I do believe it is more than mere remembrance, I believe Christ is present in the elements - but how I'm not sure. Is it spiritual? Is it full transubstatiation? Is it Luther's sacramental union? The early Christians certainly believed that the Eucharist actually was the body and blood of Christ, but I haven't yet come to a definite conclusion yet.

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  7. Hi again,Im just catching up after a long time not being able to read blogs.We too have left our church of 20 years after our minister retired.The new ministers are well not really my thing!
    Ive been to lots of different churches during the past weeks but still cant find what im looking for.I hope soon somewhere will feel right.

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    1. It's so hard isn't it? Praying you find the right place too.

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  8. I grew up Methodist and we always had grape juice - I've never come across black current juice in a Methodist Church. Yes, John Wesley believed communion was more than just remembrance, though I can't remember the details.

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    1. The church that had blackcurrant juice was one near my high school. I'm not sure what the one in our village has, I haven't visited yet. I'll let you know, lol. :)

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