Wednesday, 6 January 2010

So here I sit

surrounded by pine needles.

I've finally removed the tree and have lost the will to clean. Carrying the tree out of the living room and through the hall has left most of the tree on the floor. The remaining twig is in the back garden and I need to sweep up the tree.

School is closed today due to the inclement weather. It's a bit brighter today, although we are getting an occasional snow flurry. So there is a cacophony symphony of children's voices upstairs. My grand plans have once again been foiled. I really need to get into the village today but I'm not walking 2.5 miles in deep snow with whinging delightful children. Lol, it's Squidge, she does not do cold feet. No amount of thick socks and wellies will protect her delicate little toes and after about 15 minutes she moves into auto-moan. And after another 15 minutes she starts skriking.

'Skriking' now there's a word. Pamela mentioned it in my comments the other day. It's a dialect word used round the Lancashire area, which means crying. "Stop tha' skriking tha's bein' a reet mard!" It's an Old Norse word, the language spoken during the Viking age. There were various settlements around the north-west of England and some words have stuck as dialect. Skriking in Norwegian also to mean to cry or shriek.

So, back to the snow. Here are some pics taken the other day when went out sledging:

Chatterbox setting her sledge up

Yesterday we had one of Chatterbox's friends over for tea. Her mum was telling me that they went sledging on this hill. Chatterbox's friend whizzed down and took her Dad clean off his feet, up into the air, and landed on his shoulder and ended up having to have a week off work. Lol - but a sympathy lol of course.



The canal


There's a couple who live in a canal boat who have visited our church a couple of times. I wonder how they're doing with the canal all frozen up?

So I must be away to vacuum and then the wise men are making their appearance.

They shall bring gold and frankincense, and shall proclaim the praise of the LORD.
Isaiah 60:6b (RSV)

Collect:
O God,
who by the leading of a star
manifested your only Son to the peoples of the earth:
mercifully grant that we,
who know you now by faith,
may at last behold your glory face to face;
through Jesus Christ your Son our Lord,
who is alive and reigns with you,
in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and for ever.


5 comments:

  1. Thanks for the vocab lesson - never knew skriking was Old Norse in origin. I had to giggle when I read about Chatterbox's friend's Dad (even though it's not funny to be in so much pain!) - Vic had a similar episode one year. He came shooting down the hill and hit a small rock/boulder which propelled his sled up into the air and then it crashed down, landing him on his tailbone and in much discomfort for several days! And they say the kids have all the fun!

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  2. Poor cold-toed skriking Squidge. Schools are closed here too, and my 11 year old is wandering round in short, summer pyjamas. Why??? Ack! The 14 year old has just surfaced and is also in summer pyjamas. They must have their internal thermostats on some strange pre-teen / teenage setting.

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  3. Sophia has that teenage thermostat as well - she was wearing shorts around the house when it was -3 C yesterday!

    Saw your comment at The Bookworm - 5 selection boxes, I want to be one of your children!!

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  4. Hi Bookworm - Chatterbox has a weird inner-thermometer in summer she's cold in winter she's 'absolutely boiling'.

    Hi Pamela - I banged my coccyx on a bath-tap when I was sitting myself down to have a relaxing bath once. I couldn't sit down for a week!

    The 5 selection boxes were from various relatives. Too many I reckon, lol, all I get all day is, "Can I pleeeeaaase have another chocolate, pleeeaaassse?" Grrr.

    :)

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  5. Love the pictures .... we don't have nearly as much snow in Cambridgeshire.

    Skriking - that's a fabulous word. I am familiar with "mard". I grew up in South Manchester and you were called "mardy" if you were miserable or whiney. Sadly so much of our regional language is dying out and being replaced by blander terms.

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